Putin will allow Russians to compete at Pyeongchang Olympics

AP

Print Article

  • Russian President Vladimir Putin attends the annual Volunteer of Russia 2017 award ceremony at the Megasport Sport Palace in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017. Putin has moved an inch closer to announcing his intention to seek re-election in the next March's vote, saying he would weigh the move based on public support.(Alexei Druzhinin, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

  • 1

    Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks at a meeting with workers of the GAZ factory in Nizny Novgorod, Russia, Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017. Putin says he will seek re-election in next March's election. (Mikhail Klimentyev, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

  • 2

    Samuel Schmid, President of the IOC Inquiry Commission and former President of Switzerland, reacts during a media conference after an Executive Board meeting, in Lausanne, Switzerland, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017. Russian athletes will be allowed to compete at the upcoming Pyeongchang Olympics as neutrals despite orchestrated doping at the 2014 Sochi Games, the International Olympic Committee said Tuesday. (Jean-Christophe Bott/Keystone via AP)

  • 3

    FILE - In this Friday, Feb. 7, 2014 file photo President and CEO of the Sochi 2014 organizing committee Dmitry Chernyshenko speaks during the opening ceremony of the 2014 Winter Olympics, in Sochi, Russia. (Jung Yeon-je, Pool via AP, File)

  • 4

    A woman waves a Russian flag outside of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) headquarters in front of the Olympic Rings prior to the opening of the first day of the executive board meeting of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) at the IOC headquarters, in Pully near Lausanne, on Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017. Russian athletes will be allowed to compete at the upcoming Pyeongchang Olympics as neutrals despite orchestrated doping at the 2014 Sochi Games, the International Olympic Committee said Tuesday. (Jean-Christophe Bott, Keystone via AP)

  • 5

    FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016 file photo Russian Olympic Committee acting head Alexander Zhukov takes his sit arriving for the annual meeting in Moscow, Russia. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev, File)

  • 6

    International Olympic Committee, IOC, President Thomas Bach from Germany, left, and Samuel Schmid, President of the IOC Inquiry Commission and former President of Switzerland, right, react during a press conference after an Executive Board meeting, in Lausanne, Switzerland, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017. Russian athletes will be allowed to compete at the upcoming Pyeongchang Olympics as neutrals despite orchestrated doping at the 2014 Sochi Games, the International Olympic Committee said Tuesday. (Jean-Christophe Bott/Keystone via AP)

  • 7

    International Olympic Committee, IOC, President Thomas Bach from Germany, left, and Samuel Schmid, President of the IOC Inquiry Commission and former President of Switzerland, right, take their seats as they arrive for a press conference after an Executive Board meeting, in Lausanne, Switzerland, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017. Russian athletes will be allowed to compete at the upcoming Pyeongchang Olympics as neutrals despite orchestrated doping at the 2014 Sochi Games, the International Olympic Committee said Tuesday. (Jean-Christophe Bott/Keystone via AP)

  • 8

    FILE - In this Friday, Dec. 25, 2015 file photo, Russian Sports Minister Vitaly Mutko gestures during a news conference in Moscow, Russia. On Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017 IOC imposed a lifetime Olympic ban on Mutko. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin, File)

  • 9

    FILE - In this July 27, 2016 file photo Russia's Sports Minister Vitaly Mutko uses a mobile phone with the St.Bazil's Cathedral at the background, as he walks for a meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, in Moscow, Russia. On Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017 IOC imposed a lifetime Olympic ban on Mutko. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin, file

  • Russian President Vladimir Putin attends the annual Volunteer of Russia 2017 award ceremony at the Megasport Sport Palace in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017. Putin has moved an inch closer to announcing his intention to seek re-election in the next March's vote, saying he would weigh the move based on public support.(Alexei Druzhinin, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

  • 1

    Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks at a meeting with workers of the GAZ factory in Nizny Novgorod, Russia, Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017. Putin says he will seek re-election in next March's election. (Mikhail Klimentyev, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

  • 2

    Samuel Schmid, President of the IOC Inquiry Commission and former President of Switzerland, reacts during a media conference after an Executive Board meeting, in Lausanne, Switzerland, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017. Russian athletes will be allowed to compete at the upcoming Pyeongchang Olympics as neutrals despite orchestrated doping at the 2014 Sochi Games, the International Olympic Committee said Tuesday. (Jean-Christophe Bott/Keystone via AP)

  • 3

    FILE - In this Friday, Feb. 7, 2014 file photo President and CEO of the Sochi 2014 organizing committee Dmitry Chernyshenko speaks during the opening ceremony of the 2014 Winter Olympics, in Sochi, Russia. (Jung Yeon-je, Pool via AP, File)

  • 4

    A woman waves a Russian flag outside of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) headquarters in front of the Olympic Rings prior to the opening of the first day of the executive board meeting of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) at the IOC headquarters, in Pully near Lausanne, on Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017. Russian athletes will be allowed to compete at the upcoming Pyeongchang Olympics as neutrals despite orchestrated doping at the 2014 Sochi Games, the International Olympic Committee said Tuesday. (Jean-Christophe Bott, Keystone via AP)

  • 5

    FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016 file photo Russian Olympic Committee acting head Alexander Zhukov takes his sit arriving for the annual meeting in Moscow, Russia. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev, File)

  • 6

    International Olympic Committee, IOC, President Thomas Bach from Germany, left, and Samuel Schmid, President of the IOC Inquiry Commission and former President of Switzerland, right, react during a press conference after an Executive Board meeting, in Lausanne, Switzerland, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017. Russian athletes will be allowed to compete at the upcoming Pyeongchang Olympics as neutrals despite orchestrated doping at the 2014 Sochi Games, the International Olympic Committee said Tuesday. (Jean-Christophe Bott/Keystone via AP)

  • 7

    International Olympic Committee, IOC, President Thomas Bach from Germany, left, and Samuel Schmid, President of the IOC Inquiry Commission and former President of Switzerland, right, take their seats as they arrive for a press conference after an Executive Board meeting, in Lausanne, Switzerland, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017. Russian athletes will be allowed to compete at the upcoming Pyeongchang Olympics as neutrals despite orchestrated doping at the 2014 Sochi Games, the International Olympic Committee said Tuesday. (Jean-Christophe Bott/Keystone via AP)

  • 8

    FILE - In this Friday, Dec. 25, 2015 file photo, Russian Sports Minister Vitaly Mutko gestures during a news conference in Moscow, Russia. On Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017 IOC imposed a lifetime Olympic ban on Mutko. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin, File)

  • 9

    FILE - In this July 27, 2016 file photo Russia's Sports Minister Vitaly Mutko uses a mobile phone with the St.Bazil's Cathedral at the background, as he walks for a meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, in Moscow, Russia. On Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017 IOC imposed a lifetime Olympic ban on Mutko. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin, file

MOSCOW (AP) Russian President Vladimir Putin won't boycott the Pyeongchang Olympics.

Putin said Wednesday his government will allow Russians to compete as neutral athletes at the upcoming games in South Korea.

The International Olympic Committee has banned the Russian team from games as punishment for doping violations at the 2014 Sochi Olympics. The IOC, however, plans to invite individual Russians to compete under the Olympic flag.

"Without any doubt we will not declare any kind of blockade," Putin said in televised remarks after launching his re-election campaign at an automobile factory. "We will not block our Olympians from taking part, if any of them wish to take part as individuals.

"They have been preparing for these competitions for their whole careers, and for them it's very important."

A Russian boycott would have been the biggest at any Olympics since the Soviet Union and its allies missed the 1984 Los Angeles Games. That itself was in response to the U.S.-led boycott of the Moscow Olympics four years earlier.

Putin also said Russia still did not accept accusations that it ran a state-backed doping system around the Sochi Olympics. He called the IOC ruling "politically motivated" and unfair "collective punishment."

An IOC commission chaired by former Swiss president Samuel Schmid ruled Tuesday that there was a doping system but said it found no evidence that "the highest state authority" knew. However, it said of Yuri Nagornykh, the deputy sports minister at the time of the Sochi Games, "it is impossible to conclude that he was not aware" of doping cover-ups.

Russian athletes, coaches and politicians have lined up to condemn the IOC ruling, but most say it's better to accept it and compete.

Russian IOC member Yelena Isinbayeva, a two-time Olympic gold medalist in the pole vault, came out against a boycott.

"I'd like to tell all Russian athletes preparing for the Olympics in Pyeongchang not to get disappointed in any case and definitely not to do anything stupid like a boycott," Isinbayeva told state TV. "It's clearly not worth it."

She said the IOC choice of "Olympic Athletes from Russia" as the official designation, instead of a more neutral tag, decided the issue for her.

IOC President Thomas Bach said later Wednesday that allowing the country name to remain "was not a compromise, it was just reflecting reality" that it would be Russian athletes taking part.

Bach said he had not spoken with Putin since the sanctions were announced, and suggested Russian athletes and sports leaders would meet Tuesday to discuss competing in Pyeongchang.

They could "represent a new generation of clean Russian athletes in the games and build a bridge into a clean future of Russian sport for which they can then become ambassadors," the IOC president said.

Some Russian sports officials have been criticized for not doing enough to prevent the ban, with senior lawmakers and sports figures calling for them to be fired.

Dmitry Peskov, Putin's spokesman, said blaming officials was not a priority and that "protecting the interests of our athletes" was more important.

Under particular pressure is Vitaly Mutko. He was Russia's sports minister during the 2014 Sochi Olympics, when the IOC ruled drug-test samples were tampered with as part of a doping scheme. Mutko is now a deputy prime minister and in charge of the country's preparations for next year's soccer World Cup.

He was barred from the Olympics for life by the IOC on Tuesday.

"(Mutko) took the country into such a nightmare," figure skating coach Tatyana Tarasova told the R-Sport agency, accusing him of not doing enough to protect Russian athletes from accusations of doping. "I'm sorry for the people who have suffered because of his incompetence."

The Kremlin has vehemently denied running a state-sponsored doping program, and state media on Wednesday dismissed the ban as part of a plot to hurt Russia.

Konstantin Kosachev, chairman of the foreign affairs committee at the Russian parliament's upper house, said the ruling is "clearly part of the West's policy to restrain Russia." But he also insisted that local sports officials are to blame and "ought to bear personal responsibility" for letting it happen.

Vladimir Poletayev, deputy chairman of the committee on procedures at the Federation Council, went even further.

"All our sports officials, including the Russian Olympic Committee, ought to be personally accountable for the ban on Russia and ought to step down," Poletayev said in comments carried by the RIA Novosti news agency.

Also Wednesday, the Court of Arbitration for Sport said it has registered appeals by 22 Russian athletes against their disqualifications from the 2014 Sochi Olympics for doping. CAS said the athletes have requested verdicts before the Pyeongchang Games open on Feb. 9. The appeals relate to earlier bans against individual athletes, not the ruling on the Russian team.

The IOC is now working on "operational guidelines" that will oversee enforcing restrictions on Russian participation in Pyeongchang. These include approving a manufacturer and a design of team uniforms, and what Russian symbols, such as national flags, fans will be allowed to use in Olympic venues.

___

Associated Press writer Nataliya Vasilyeva in Moscow and AP Sports Writer Graham Dunbar in Lausanne, Switzerland, contributed to this report.

        

Print Article

Read More World News

PM announces on state TV Iraq's war against IS has ended

AP

December 09, 2017 at 12:18 pm | BAGHDAD (AP) After more than three years of combat operations, Iraq announced Saturday that the fight against the Islamic State group is over after the country's security forces drove the extremist...

Comments

Read More

Arab foreign ministers blast Trump over Jerusalem

AP

December 09, 2017 at 1:13 pm | CAIRO (AP) Arab foreign ministers kicked off an emergency meeting Saturday in the Egyptian capital with scathing criticism of President Trump's decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital, ...

Comments

Read More

Irish border lives and livelihoods hinge on Brexit outcome

AP

December 09, 2017 at 5:00 am | FLORENCECOURT, Northern Ireland (AP) Farmer John Sheridan drives his mud-caked Land Rover up and down country lanes and roads, back and forth across the snaking border separating Northern Ireland a...

Comments

Read More

The Latest: US congratulates Iraq on end of war against IS

AP

December 09, 2017 at 10:10 am | BAGHDAD (AP) The Latest on developments in Iraq (all times local): 8:05 p.m. The United States congratulates Iraq following the prime minister's announcement that the war against the Islami...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

(208) 263-9534
PO Box 159
Sandpoint, ID 83864

©2017 Bonner County Daily Bee Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X