Little visits local schools

Print Article

  • (Photo by MARY MALONE) Sandpoint High School’s Cedar Post crew enlisted Lt. Gov. Brad Little on Thursday to help out with their morning announcements for Friday.

  • 1

    (Photo by MARY MALONE) Clark Fork High School freshmen Sierra Swales-Tally, left, and Leslie Montgomery, right, pose with Lt. Gov. Brad Little Thursday as CFHS as he made his rounds through the local high schools.

  • 2

    (Photo by MARY MALONE) Lt. Gov. Brad Little answers a question posed by a Sandpoint High School student Thursday as he made his rounds through the local high schools.

  • 3

    (Photo by MARY MALONE) Clark Fork High School leadership students greeted Lt. Gov. Brad Little Thursday. CFHS was his first stop as he made his rounds through the local high schools.

  • 4

    (Photo by MARY MALONE) Lt. Gov. Brad Little made a stop at Lake Pend Oreille High School to chat with governent and science students as he made his rounds through the local high schools Thursday.

  • (Photo by MARY MALONE) Sandpoint High School’s Cedar Post crew enlisted Lt. Gov. Brad Little on Thursday to help out with their morning announcements for Friday.

  • 1

    (Photo by MARY MALONE) Clark Fork High School freshmen Sierra Swales-Tally, left, and Leslie Montgomery, right, pose with Lt. Gov. Brad Little Thursday as CFHS as he made his rounds through the local high schools.

  • 2

    (Photo by MARY MALONE) Lt. Gov. Brad Little answers a question posed by a Sandpoint High School student Thursday as he made his rounds through the local high schools.

  • 3

    (Photo by MARY MALONE) Clark Fork High School leadership students greeted Lt. Gov. Brad Little Thursday. CFHS was his first stop as he made his rounds through the local high schools.

  • 4

    (Photo by MARY MALONE) Lt. Gov. Brad Little made a stop at Lake Pend Oreille High School to chat with governent and science students as he made his rounds through the local high schools Thursday.

SANDPOINT — Lt. Gov. Brad Little made his rounds through the local high schools Thursday and, as Gov. Butch Otter was out of state, pointed out that he was actually acting governor.

"He always comes back though, so I don't do anything too crazy while he's gone," Little joked with the students of Clark Fork Junior/Senior High School, which was the first stop on his tour.

Little made stops at Clark Fork, Lake Pend Oreille and Sandpoint high schools where he gave a brief introduction before turning it over to the students for questions — and did they have questions.

"I think the awareness, in all three instances, the political awareness is pretty impressive," Little told the Daily Bee as the tour came to an end. "I was surprised I got two net neutrality questions."

Students at Clark Fork and SHS asked Little about net neutrality because of the upcoming vote by the Federal Communications Commission on whether to repeal current net neutrality rules. Little said while it is the role of the federal government, he could make "both sides" of the argument.

Little said he views the internet as a utility that is "so important," the government has to have a role in it. If there is a provider using 85 percent of the capacity, he said the government should look at it and figure out how to keep one person from consuming so much.

SHS students, of which the majority in attendance were from government and related SHS classes, asked about gender and racial issues in Idaho, sustainable agriculture, the stereotype of Republican attitudes toward public education, healthcare and more. In Clark Fork, students also asked about North Korea, climate change, mining and illegal immigration. Students at both schools also asked about Little's stance on marijuana legalization and gun laws, as well as the process of getting into politics.

The students at LPOHS were a mix of government and science students, so many of their questions surrounded energy in Idaho. One student, for example, asked "Is it possible to completely convert Idaho to renewable energy sources?"

"You are going to have to get energy storage technology up there because the sun doesn't shine all the time and the wind doesn't blow all the time," Little said. "... The technology for storage is going up all the time ... It's important that you have a very reliable energy supply and I am not an advocate for anything other than very reliable power."

LPOHS students also asked about nuclear energy, education funding, Idaho's grocery tax, the economy and employment rates.

Mary Malone can be reached by email at mmalone@bonnercountydailybee.com and follow her on Twitter @MaryDailyBee.

Print Article

Read More Local News

Bill would boost caregiver support

December 16, 2017 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press COEUR d’ALENE — Caregivers, help could be on the way. The cavalry’s banner, hoisted by Idaho AARP, will be introduced in the 2018 legislative session. The bill is called the Idaho Family Caregiver A...

Comments

Read More

Crash injuries claim local woman’s life

December 16, 2017 at 5:00 am | Bonner County Daily Bee BONNERS FERRY — A Ponderay woman who was seriously injured in a collision north of Bonners Ferry on Dec. 2 has died, Idaho State Police said on Friday. State police said Jennifer R. Jones was southb...

Comments

Read More

‘Tots’ brings Christmas to all youth

December 16, 2017 at 5:00 am | Bonner County Daily Bee SANDPOINT — Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade is a beloved tradition — millions either watch it on television or travel to New York City to watch the massive balloons make their way around the city. Th...

Comments

Read More

StoryWalk promotes both happiness and health

December 16, 2017 at 5:00 am | Bonner County Daily Bee PONDERAY — Reading and the outdoors are both important when it comes to the physical and mental health of children. Therefore, combining literacy with nature is an ideal way to keep kids healthy. Ka...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

(208) 263-9534
PO Box 159
Sandpoint, ID 83864

©2017 Bonner County Daily Bee Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X