Training on trains

Print Article

  • (BRIAN WALKER/Hagadone News Network) Northern Lakes Fire District firefighter Justin Brodin lowers a “patient” from a BNSF Railway locomotive during recent training at BNSF’s refueling depot on the Rathdrum Prairie. This method may be utilized during an actual emergency due to confined space in the engine.

  • 1

    (BRIAN WALKER/Press) From left, Northern Lakes Firefighter /Medic Aaron O’Brien, Firefighter Justin Brodin and Firefighter Garrett Kitterman work to rescue a “patient” in the tight quarters and out the window of a BNSF Railway locomotive.

  • 2

    Northern Lakes Fire District Division Chief Mike Mather calls for assistance as simulated smoke billows from a fire engine during training at BNSF Railway’s refueling depot on the Rathdrum Prairie. (BRIAN WALKER/Press)

  • 3

    From left, Northern Lakes Firefighter/Medic Bill Daniels, Firefighter Justin Brodin and Firefighter/Medic Matt Dill work to rescue a “patient” from a BNSF Railway locomotive during training. (BRIAN WALKER/Press)

  • 4

    Northern Lakes Fire District Division Chief Mike Mather communicates with other rescuers below during locomotive training as simulated smoke pours out of the engine. (BRIAN WALKER/Press)

  • (BRIAN WALKER/Hagadone News Network) Northern Lakes Fire District firefighter Justin Brodin lowers a “patient” from a BNSF Railway locomotive during recent training at BNSF’s refueling depot on the Rathdrum Prairie. This method may be utilized during an actual emergency due to confined space in the engine.

  • 1

    (BRIAN WALKER/Press) From left, Northern Lakes Firefighter /Medic Aaron O’Brien, Firefighter Justin Brodin and Firefighter Garrett Kitterman work to rescue a “patient” in the tight quarters and out the window of a BNSF Railway locomotive.

  • 2

    Northern Lakes Fire District Division Chief Mike Mather calls for assistance as simulated smoke billows from a fire engine during training at BNSF Railway’s refueling depot on the Rathdrum Prairie. (BRIAN WALKER/Press)

  • 3

    From left, Northern Lakes Firefighter/Medic Bill Daniels, Firefighter Justin Brodin and Firefighter/Medic Matt Dill work to rescue a “patient” from a BNSF Railway locomotive during training. (BRIAN WALKER/Press)

  • 4

    Northern Lakes Fire District Division Chief Mike Mather communicates with other rescuers below during locomotive training as simulated smoke pours out of the engine. (BRIAN WALKER/Press)

By BRIAN WALKER

Hagadone News Network

Local responders recently learned just how tight rescues can be inside a locomotive during the first hands-on training of its type in this area at BNSF Railway’s refueling depot on the Rathdrum Prairie.

"We are a business, but we would not be in business if we weren’t safe," said Courtney Wallace, BNSF spokeswoman. "It’s important to have these conversations with the local responders. This is so important not only for the education, but building relationships."

Either way responders rescued "patients" from inside a locomotive — through a side window and down a ladder on a backboard or out the front door and down the engine’s stairs — they learned just how difficult it is to work within the tight confines of the locomotive.

"With locomotives being made of structural steel that’s designed for accidents, this isn’t something that your traditional tools like the Jaws of Life will allow you to get into," Justin Piper, BNSF’s director of hazardous materials, told about 30 responders. "If you can’t get a person out (the door), the next easiest place is through a window."

Northern Lakes, which covers Rathdrum, Hayden and Hayden Lake; Timberlake, which covers Athol and Bayview; Hauser Lake Fire; BNSF; and the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality were among the agencies that participated in the training.

"As we grow as a community, these scenarios could come up more often, so it’s important to partner with railroad companies such as BNSF," said Mike Mather, Northern Lakes division chief.

Responders also learned about hazards on a train, including high-voltage components, up to 5,500 gallons of diesel, compressed air and lead acid batteries.

"There are things you need to understand before you approach the equipment," Piper said.

A dry chemical extinguisher, not water, should be used on train fires, Piper said.

Responders were also told to resist the urge to be on the roof of an engine and to push buttons during a mission.

Locomotive fires can start with air filters, electrical wiring, turbo chargers, fuel spills, crank case explosions and motors.

Responders were familiarized with fluid colors on the train that can help them while responding, including green being cooling water; red, diesel fuel; black, lube oil; clear, battery acid; and blue, toilet tank fluid.

Railroad crossings have a location number and an 800 number for the public to call in case of emergencies so responders can arrive on scene as fast as possible.

"We could be responding to a train out in the middle of nowhere, so it’s important to know how to size things up," Mather said.

Print Article

Read More Local News

Organic ag center sets open house

October 21, 2018 at 5:00 am | Bonner County Daily Bee SANDPOINT — The University of Idaho College of Agricultural and Life Sciences will host an open house at its new Sandpoint Organic Agriculture Center from 3-6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 23. The 48-acre Sand...

Comments

Read More

Work to close railroad crossings

October 21, 2018 at 5:00 am | Bonner County Daily Bee SANDPOINT — Several closures are planned at the end of the week by BNSF Railway as crews work on railroad crossings. The first closure will be Wednesday, Oct. 24, at the south end of Cocolalla Loop ...

Comments

Read More

Explosives cause evacuation

October 21, 2018 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press By RALPH BARTHOLDT Hagadone News Network COEUR d’ALENE — A box of explosives in the back of a pickup truck Friday caused the evacuation of a school near the Coeur d’Alene Police Department and su...

Comments

Read More

City mulls special event fees, procedure

October 21, 2018 at 5:00 am | Bonner County Daily Bee SANDPOINT — In accordance with the city’s strategic planning process, one goal of Sandpoint officials is to implement policies and procedures that provide clarity and consistency. As such, a worksho...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

(208) 263-9534
PO Box 159
Sandpoint, ID 83864

©2018 Bonner County Daily Bee Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X