Education ID’d as top priority in community

Print Article

SANDPOINT — After months of discussions and research, a team of community leaders have identified education as the cure for a multitude of woes.

Participants of the Bonner/Boundary Priority Planning Project met Thursday afternoon to finalize prioritization for their work, the second phase of a five-part process designed to craft community improvement projects. After dozens of meetings involving more than 80 volunteers, participants identified economic vitality and education as the top priority for the region.

“We realized that educational needs were a common theme that underlined all of this,” Bonner County Economic Development Corporation director Karl Dye said.

The first effort the group made was to pinpoint root causes for problems in five categories, including economic vitality, education, community safety, the environment and local health.

Members identified a low percentage of advanced degrees in the community as key issues for both economic vitality and education. Community safety experts were concerned about a lack of access to mental health care and a high suicide rate. The environmental team targeted a lack of knowledge and appreciation for the environment as their root cause. Finally, health care experts noted that residents ignoring treatable illnesses was uncommonly prevalent in the Panhandle counties.  

Project members voted to tie economic vitality and education together as the top priority. According to Dye, the low percentage of individuals who achieve college degrees oftentimes grinds business potential to a halt. By helping individuals earn these degrees, he said community leaders are not only improving individuals but also expanding economic potential and appeal to existing companies.

 “If you can raise the number of degrees in an area, you become more attractive to businesses,” Dye said.

With the initiation and prioritization phases in the bag, team members now have a direction for the rest of the project. Future meetings will focus on strategy by establishing goals and data-driven programs. After that comes implementation, during which volunteers seek funding and partnerships with appropriate nonprofits. Finally, the evaluation phase measures progress and adjusts procedures to be more effective. After that, the whole process simply starts over again.

“We’ve all worked very hard,” Dye said. “I want us all to come away with something we can see, believe in and work on together.”

Print Article

Read More News

5 things to know about China's twice-a-decade party congress

AP

October 18, 2017 at 10:08 pm | BEIJING (AP) — The crucial parts are being held behind closed doors, but journalists, academics and more than a billion Chinese citizens are closely watching for any public hints signaling change at ...

Comments

Read More

China's conflicted goals: Freer markets, more party control

AP

October 18, 2017 at 9:10 pm | BEIJING (AP) — China's ruling Communist Party is expanding its role in business even as it promises freer markets and support for entrepreneurs on the eve of President Xi Jinping's second five-year t...

Comments

Read More

Historic hotel hosts ‘haunting’ expeditions

October 18, 2017 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press WALLACE — Rain began to pound the old rooftops of Wallace just after a group of women slipped inside the historic Jameson Hotel. Led by Coeur d’Alene medium and master healer Jennifer Von Behren, th...

Comments

Read More

Great Idaho ShakeOut is promote earthquake safety

October 18, 2017 at 5:00 am | Bonner County Daily Bee Just last month parts of eastern Idaho were rattled by more than 140 small earthquakes. Idaho is the 6th most seismically active state in the country. That’s why the Great Idaho ShakeOut is the perfe...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

(208) 263-9534
PO Box 159
Sandpoint, ID 83864

©2017 Bonner County Daily Bee Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X